Author Archives: Sean Huang

You Can Now Buy Buffet Leftovers — For a Really Low Price

 

As much as 40 percent of food in the U.S. is¬†thrown away uneaten, and despite this, there are still children that are still hungry. Roughly one in six of U.S. households are on food stamp, which reflects that there are still large uneven food distribution in the U.S.¬†Food wastes come from many sources, let it be the produces that were thrown out of groceries after “sell by” date, or bruised fruits that doesn’t mean the aesthetic standard to be sold. The latter example is a major problem in U.S. as half of the produce grown domestically got thrown away because it was bruised or misshaped. It turns out that in most case, a simple discoloration of the fruits and vegetables pose no health hazard and can be safely consumed. Not only that food wastes contributed to the food security issue, but decomposed food wastes in landfill release methane, a gas that contributed to global warming as well.

Restaurants are a major source of commercial food waste, especially the one that offered buffet, as toward the end of the business hour, there are food leftovers that are still good to eat. To keep the standard, the restaurants throw the leftovers away to make way for the food for the next business day. If the food is still good, why don’t we just give it to people who needed (or wanted) it? Fear not, there are now a website and an app where you can order leftover food from the buffets, and several location in U.S. already participated in the business.

The app is called BuffetGo, and is available in eight countries, including the U.S., though American customers still have to wait for the app, but for now they must make an order through the website. Using the app is simple, just type in a zip code, make an order, and go pick it up at the restaurant, all for a single-digit dollars, which is up to 90% mark off from the original price. Even a to-go box worth of food may cost as low as $1, this can potentially saves a lot of food waste and help mitigate the problem where people of lower economic background can’t effort food.

I have heard from social media that it’s mandatory for a grocery store to give expired food to the charity in France, but hearing that something different, but serve similar goal is now available in the U.S. Because 40% of the food waste is a large percentage, that’s can as well feed nearly additional 150 million more American than the U.S. have right now. It’s not that we didn’t grow enough food, but it’s that we didn’t use our food more efficiently.

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